Addie Roanhorse speaks about the importance of family, her connection to Osage murders, her art and work for the Osage Nation

By: Roseanne McKee

Republished with permission of the Bartlesville Examiner-Enterprise

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Addie Roanhorse at Bartlesville Art Association’s ArtNight, February 2019.

Artist Addie Roanhorse spoke for the first ArtNight of 2019 in February at the Bartlesville Art Association’s design center.

Roanhorse, who works for the Osage Nation as a graphic designer and photographer, gave a slide presentation highlighting the breadth of her work in graphic design, painting, photography and mixed media.

She covered too much ground to be written in one article, so in the E-E, the articles were split into several columns. Here, three are combined into one. However, there will be one more to be published next week.

Roanhorse began with the importance of family.

“My family is obviously number one for me. My family is why I’m an artist. The Killers of the Flower Moon book — I have a relation in the book,” said Roanhorse.

Slides provided examples of her work in progress and completed pieces.

“Family is the most important thing as an Osage. We’re always taught that our elders and our children are the most coveted thing. They’re precious and we can learn from both. So, of course I would start out with my family.

“My mom, her name was Gina Gray. She went to the Institute of the American Indian Arts, and she also went to CalArts,” she said.

Roanhorse grew up mainly in Santa Fe but traveled back to Pawhuska to see grandparents.

She moved back to Oklahoma to finish her degree at Rogers State University in Claremore. When her mother was diagnosed with cancer, Roanhorse moved in with her to care for her. Gina Gray died three months later.

“I believe everything happens for a reason. … I would never in a million years think oh, I live in Pawhuska, but here I am living in my mom’s house.

“It was kind of therapeutic in a way because I got to work on the last projects in college. It was bittersweet. …”

Upon graduating she went to the Osage Chief and pointed out that the tribe had no artistic position — no graphic artist. Chief Standing Bear agreed that there was a need.

“He said, ‘when do you graduate?’ I said, ‘on Saturday.’ He said, ok, be here Monday and I started work on Tuesday. They literally created the position for me, and I’ve been there ever since,” she said with a smile.

She showed slides of her mother’s art. “She did watercolors,” Roanhorse said. “She did a lot of warriors. … Now I actually do a lot of strong women. … She always represented parts of our culture — different bands and clans and just kind of brought our people into our artwork. That’s a huge indicator of my artwork too. It’s who I am. If I were a writer, I’d be writing about the Osage people and our culture.”

She described her daughter, Anya, age 11, as the Tiny Indian. “That’s her nickname.”

She showed her work at the SantaFe art market. She got a ribbon and sold out and this was at age 10. Anya has also taken up photography.

“The local newspaper pays her $40 per print so any big event she’s always out there being the on the beat person.”

“This is [Anya’s] latest venture. She’s doing embroidery on canvas. She put a little bit of black paint on the canvas and said, ‘it’s mixed media.’ So, she’s learning, but I’m super proud of her.

“My brother Danté, he’s an artist as well. He’s an oil painter. It’s almost like if you took my mom’s artwork and split it in two. I took one side, and my brother took the other. His artwork is very — it’s dreams.

“He’s a combat vet from Afghanistan, and we’ve had him home now for four years so it’s really nice that he’s started to paint again. I believe Pendleton Blanket has picked up this piece. …”

Her grandfather, who passed away when she was about 10, was a full-blood Osage.

“Everything I remember about him is just so vivid. Everything he taught us about Pawhuska, our culture and being a small business owner. He was a really great guy.”

She showed a photo of him in regalia during the In Lon Shka dances held each June in Pawhuska.

Her grandmother was mostly Osage but a little bit French, she said.

“Her mother was Grace Roan and Grace’s father was Henry Roan. … that’s the connection to Henry.”

He was one of the Osages written about in the book “Killers of the Flower Moon” by David Grann.

“We went to the book signing of David Grann in Pawhuska … he looked up at me and said ‘…I just want you know there are going to be things in this book you probably have never heard’ and he was absolutely right. It took me several months just to get through the first section of it. I’m glad the story is finally out there.

She saw a friend in who had read the book and said, “I’m sorry. … Being just in Bartlesville, this close, and nobody’s ever talked about this. No one knew about this. …”

Recently, while acting as the Osage Museum’s acting director, museum she received questions about her great-great grandfather.

“It’s uncomfortable sometimes … because people want to know uncomfortable things about what happened. … I want to educate them, but it’s gone a little too far sometimes with the questioning. I just try to be polite, and do the best I can.”

She shifted topics to her paintings.

Roanhorse has integrated oil lease maps into her art.

She showed a painting of an Osage woman and said, “There’s nothing more of an indicator that connects Osage people to their land then oil. I’m also a seamstress so I decided to cut the maps up … I’m making a shirt out of it.”

The forehead of the woman’s face was red. Roanhorse used red tissue paper to create this effect. She used molding paste and acrylic paint applied in beads from a cake-decorating bag to give the art more dimension.

Roanhorse showed a slide of another piece that she said was reminiscent of screen printing.

She showed another portrait of a woman with Prismacolor on canvas with ledger paper from 1897 utilized for clothing.

“It’s pretty delicate but when I get it down, it’s nice.”

She showed another portrait containing actual Pawhuska phone book strips.

She explained, “in Pawhuska the first three digits are always 287. Growing up visiting Pawhuska, I just thought it was the funniest thing when somebody gave their phone number — they’d just give the last four digits.”

She showed a painting of her grandfather, which included Osage orthography.

“I created stencils and spray paint to kind of give it a different effect. And then that’s an actual photograph. …”

On the next slide, she showed a painting of her grandmother, which she described as “more calm” than the one of her grandfather. At the bottom of the painting were red hand prints in a row.

“Those are my daughter’s handprints from when she was five. “The red hand represents friendship on our blankets that we make,” she said.

She showed a painting of her great-great grandfather, Henry Roan.

“Now that you get access to everything on the internet, I stumbled upon the FBI files. You can literally pore through documents and so I started printing off documents … there are actual pieces of the story. Western Union communication back and forth with Hoover. So, I thought that was an interesting way to present it, and you have to get up close to it to see it — to read it.”

For another of her paintings she went to her elders committee to ask for permission to depict tattoos.

“My biggest fear is that someone will see it and be like, ‘oh yeah, I’m going to go get tattoos,’ but these are warrior tattoos. I got the clearance from them. … It’s another opportunity for me to talk about my people and get firsthand information. … With the internet people just assume they know what they want to know about us but if you open a dialogue with people that ask questions about it — I think that’s the best way you can.”

In another painting she uses stippling to create the look of a lazy stitch used in Osage beadwork.

“I just liked the effect … when we were in Santa Fe there were people who thought it was real and they came up and tried to touch it — like real beadwork.”

Regarding her graphic design, she said she does a lot of logos.

“There’s a lot that I have access to so I started to incorporate the photography in and again this is a flyer but if you look closely it’s actually the back of a girl’s shirt. There’s the stitching. It’s a ribbon that goes down and there’s the button that holds the ribbon together. So, it’s just kind of always trying to weave my culture into it.

She said that when Osages see it they recognize what is being depicted.
“It makes me feel good.”

For the Osage Attorney General’s logo she incorporated the scales of justice into the Osage orthography.

For the Oil and Gas Summit she included Osage ribbonwork.

“I get access to moments that most people don’t get to see. When the Killers of the Flower Moon production company came they were cedaring off everybody. She photographed a moment when Chief Standing Bear was being cedared off.

Another photo she had taken was of an eldest son, phonetically “ee-low-mpa” in the Osage language, going to the arbor to dance at In Lon shka for the first time.

“He had a little skip in his walk, and he was proud.”

One day she accompanied the Wildland Fire Department as they fought spring wildfires in the Osage.

She was in a fire truck between Hominy and Skiatook.

“There were fires all around, and it was quite the scene. It was exciting. This was kind of the aftermath.” Fire Chief Ross Walker was in the photo and through the landscape and smoke there was an oil rig in the background.”

Finally, she showed a photo from behind of Chief Standing Bear with his grandson talking to him about getting ready to enter the arbor and be roached, a ceremony in which an eagle feather is placed on the headdress. His uncle Joe Don Brave’s hands are shown assisting with the placement of the headdress.
Another photo she showed was of the first time they brought in the bison on Bluestem Ranch, which is owned by the Osage Nation, and prayed over them, she said.

“The sun was setting and the natural light worked with it.”

“This was at our dance as well. This is one of our elders about to lead all the men into the arbor into our dances — every June.”

Another photo was of the drum being brought to the arbor.

“Each district had their own drum and so it’s very poignant moment to see all the men coming with the drum.”

Crystal Bridges is building a new performing and visual arts complex. Closer to the town square is an old Kraft cheese plant. They’re keeping the structure … but they are completely gutting it.

The director contacted her.

“I was asked if I could design a pattern to be etched on glass that would go on the façade of this building. … I’m honored to do it,” Roanhorse said.

She went to Bentonville, Ark., and the director said, “I just want to honor the people who were here pre-colonial. … It felt really good that they wanted to honor Osage people. That was our hunting territory way before any of this.”
She named the design “sway” explaining her intention that the design would suggest movement and be based on the finger-woven belt worn in Osage women’s regalia.

The belt that is fixed at the waist of Osage women’s regalia, and flows down the back.

“Women wear it, and when you dance, it starts swaying. And when I was a little girl, I used to think that was the coolest thing. I’d be with my aunties, and we’d be dancing … it’s just this moment and this feeling that, again, only Osages would truly understand.

She simplified the design in the belt and created the suggestion of movement in the design.

“The entryway of the design will actually go up and over in a very large scale. Then there’s the façade on this side and it goes up five stories. So, it will have the design, really tiny, going all the way up. … At night they’ll shoot movies on it.

“It’s way bigger than I could ever … and when I went and saw it, it was amazing what they’ve done. I got to work with architects in Chicago. … It’s just been a great experience. … They plan on opening February 2020.

Osage Nation Museum Curator takes position at American Indian Cultural Center and Museum

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Osage Nation Museum Curator, Hallie Winter

Photo by Roseanne McKee

By Geneva HorseChief-Hamilton, ON Communications

It has been a few short, and very busy, years filled with more than Hallie Winter (Osage) imagined when she left Buffalo, N.Y., in early 2015 to become the new director at the Osage Nation Museum (ONM). In that time, she has organized several successful events and amazing exhibitions, received honors and awards, and completed a museum renovation.
Her successes at ONM have earned her recognition in the museum community and now a position at the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum (AICCM) in Oklahoma City scheduled to open in Spring 2021. At the end of the month she will join the AICCM team where she will be the new collections manager.
“It’s really very bittersweet,” said Winter about her departure from ONM at the end of this month. “I really put my heart and soul into the museum and I would like to thank my Osage community for welcoming and supporting me. It has been a wonderful experience to be back home again and to be involved with my culture.”
She said her first mission at ONM when she arrived was to begin renovating the museum and to update preservation and storage resources and methods. Winter’s second mission was connecting a now updated Osage Museum with the community it served, the Osage people and anyone wanting to learn about the Osage.
It took less than a year to get the museum ready for its first new exhibition and from there the museum took off. Winter said she remembers feeling overwhelmed with the incredible responsibility of these efforts but also feeling so thankful to be given the opportunity to help her people through history preservation and education.
“We are extremely proud that one of our own will represent us at the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City. [Winter] has done a lot of hard work and brought our small museum into the 21st century making it an excellent destination spot. Her work has been recognized nationally by the American Alliance of Museums and the National Center for American Indian Enterprise (NCAIE) ‘40 Under 40’ 2018 awards. I am proud of Hallie, excited for her new opportunity, but sad that we are losing such an impressive young lady to another museum,” said the Osage Nation Director of Operations Casey Johnson.
Working at the AICCM is an amazing opportunity and will put an Osage perspective and Osage voice at an international destination that is being shaped to redefine Native American history and contributions. The American Indian Cultural Center and Museum mission is to generate awareness and understanding of the history of tribes and their relationship to Oklahoma today.
“We are humbled to bring aboard Hallie Winter to the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum team. She is a highly qualified American Indian museum professional who has accomplished much throughout her career, most recently at the Osage Nation Museum. The Osage people can be assured that one of their own has an important role in developing and sharing the collective American Indian experience in Oklahoma today. We look forward to further strengthening our relationship with the Osage Nation and the other Native nations across the state of Oklahoma and around the country,” said Jim Pepper Henry (Kaw citizen and Muscogee Creek), AICCM CEO & Director.
Winter said it was hard to find the words to express how much she has learned and how humbled she feels to have been the director at ONM. She said the opportunity brought insight to her life that could only have been gained by living and working with her people. “Being the director of ONM has allowed me to delve deep into Osage history and to be an active member in our community. This position has allowed me to grow both personally and professionally and I will be forever grateful to the Nation for giving me this opportunity. I’m very proud of the work I have completed here and I am confident that the ONM is set up to succeed in the future and to grow.”
About the Osage Nation Museum
The premiere destination to experience Osage history, art, and culture
Visit the Osage Nation Museum (ONM) in historic Pawhuska, Oklahoma. Our continuously changing exhibits convey the story of the Osage people throughout history and celebrate Osage culture today. Highlights include an extensive photograph collection, historical artifacts, and traditional and contemporary art. Founded in 1938, the ONM is the oldest tribally owned museum in the United States.
Admission and parking is free.
Contact Information
Phone: 918-287-5441
Email:museum@osagenation-nsn.gov
Website:www.osagenation-nsn.gov/museum
Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/OsageNationMuseum/
Location: 819 Grandview Ave., Pawhuska, Okla. 74056.

Free Workshop at Osage Nation Museum March 3

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The Osage Nation Museum (ONM) and Osage Teaching Artist Addie Roanhorse will be conducting a Monotype Printmaking Workshop from 12 – 4 p.m. on March 3, in conjunction with the Traditional Values/Contemporary Vision: Works by Gina Gray. This workshop is free and open to the public of all ages. No prior experience is necessary.

Gina Gray was known for her monotypes, many of which are currently on exhibit at the ONM. Over the years Gray developed her very own graphic sense and style with her prolific monotype production. Using vibrant colors, bold, yet elegant lines, and striking silhouettes; Gray’s depictions of Osage culture evoke traditional values with both insight and contemporary vision. We invite participants to join us at the ONM to learn how to create monotype prints using the same methods Gray used. Participants will experience the joys and possibilities of monotype printmaking using Gina Gray’s prints as inspiration.

This workshop is designed for anyone who has an interest in monotype printmaking and wants to learn more. Participants will learn how to create monotype prints and will leave with several original art pieces. This art form is a quick and easy way to create unique, one-of-a-kind prints.

Demonstrations of the process will be conducted every hour starting at 12pm. This instruction will encourage participants to create prints that reflect their personal voice and expression. Various techniques will be explained, including additive and subtractive methods, use of stencils, as well as proper inking methods, and press instruction.

About Teaching Artist Addie Roanhorse

Addie Roanhorse is an Osage artist and graphic designer working predominantly in mixed media and serigraph printing. Roanhorse works for the Osage Nation as their in-house Graphic Designer/Photographer. Addie’s contemporary realism approach to art depicts the details of her culture, incorporating the balance of clean lines and texture. She recently showed at Santa Fe Indian Art Market with her 10-year-old daughter Anya. Roanhorse completed her BFA with an emphasis in Visual Arts at Rogers State University in 2015. Her exposure to art began early in her childhood, influenced by her parents who are both professional artists. She was immersed in an artist’s lifestyle, living in Santa Fe, New Mexico and on the Southern Coast of California with her parents. Roanhorse spent summers with her grandparents on the Osage reservation in Oklahoma where she currently resides with her daughter Anya.

About the Osage Nation Museum
The premiere destination to experience Osage history, art, and culture

Visit the Osage Nation Museum (ONM) in historic Pawhuska, Oklahoma. Our continuously changing exhibits convey the story of the Osage people throughout history and celebrate Osage culture today. Highlights include an extensive photograph collection, historical artifacts, as well as traditional and contemporary art. Founded in 1938, the ONM is the oldest tribally owned museum in the United States.

Admission and parking is free.

Contact Information
Phone: 918-287-5441
Fax: 918-287-5227
Email: museum@osagenation-nsn.gov
Website: http://www.osagenation-nsn.gov/museum
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OsageNationMuseum/

Location
819 Grandview Avenue
Pawhuska, OK 74056

Angel Tree Seeks Angels

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By Geneva HorseChief-Hamilton, Osage Nation Communications

Pawhuska, Okla., (Wednesday, November 22, 2017) — The goal is for every child to receive a Christmas gift. Every year, the Osage Nation Financial Assistance Department (ONFAD) hosts the Annual Tree of Gifts to support the spirit of giving and provide children in need with a holiday that includes unwrapping presents that otherwise would not be there.

Helping is easy. There is a tree filled with ornaments with Christmas wish lists attached from local children. To donate, visit the Osage Nation Financial Assistance Department located at the new Welcome Center at 239 West 12th Street, Pawhuska, Okla., or contact the office at (918) 287-5325.

All gifts must be delivered to the ONFAD offices by December 18, 2017.

Financial Assistance is also requesting donations of gift bags, wrapping paper, bows, tape, and gift tags. There will also be an opportunity to help with gift wrapping and deliveries. Call (918) 287-5325 for more information.
 
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE MISSION STATEMENT
To aid members of the Osage Nation, and other Native Americans residing in our service area, during times of limited resources and/or provide an opportunity to achieve self-sufficiency through individual employment plans.
Website: http://www.osagenation-nsn.gov/what-we-do/financial-assistance
Physical Address: 239 W 12th Street, Pawhuska, OK 74056
Mailing Address: 627 Grandview, Pawhuska, OK  74056
Phone: 918-287-5325
Fax: 918-287-5593

Osage Nation Museum to hold Holiday Ornament Craft Workshop

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By: Hallie Winter, Osage Nation Museum Curator

Pawhuska, OK—The Osage Nation Museum is happy to announce the award of a Charitable Grant from the Osage Nation Foundation. This grant will be used to fund the 1st Annual Creative Community Holiday Ornament Craft Workshop.

The ONM will host their first annual Creative Community Holiday Ornament Craft Workshop during the month of December. Starting on December 1st the ONM will have their Imagination Station set up with materials for visitors to make a holiday ornament. The Imagination Station is an engaging, interactive area in the museum’s exhibit gallery that is geared towards our youth visitors. However, visitors of all ages are welcome to participate. The ONM staff select activities that correlate with current exhibits and special programming to facilitate the hands on participation of visitors in a meaningful, creative and educational way. The activity for the month of December will be a simple paper cut out ornament with Osage designs. By using Osage themes and motifs this will help visitors learn about Osage culture while connecting with the Museum’s collection. Visitors can either take their ornament home or leave it with museum staff for inclusion on the ONM’s Holiday Tree.

Another station will be set up in the museum’s gallery that will tie into the Creative Community Holiday Ornament Craft Workshop. We ask visitors to add to our paper chain garland, using the theme: #weloveonm. We invite visitors to write down what they love about the ONM, these written comments will make up the paper chain garland that will decorate the ONM holiday tree.
On Saturday, December 10th the ONM will host a 6 hour pop in event, no registration required. The event will be held from 10:00am – 4:00pm. This will be open to the public and all ages are welcome. The ONM will be collaborating with Osage Artists, the Wah Zha Zhi Cultural Center and the ON Education STEAM department to produce unique, thoughtful and educational ornaments. We will have four craft stations set up, each with an Osage artist and teaching assistants to help visitors create one of a kind holiday ornaments. Each of the four stations will have a holiday ornament craft that is geared towards youth and easy to make.

The ONM will have two ornaments that visitors can make which tie into the Museum’s collection and mission statement. The Wah Zha Zhi Cultural Center and the ON Education STEAM program will also have tables set up with one ornament each for visitors to make. We will ask the patrons to leave their ornament at the museum when it is complete. Participants will also be able to leave their hand print for the ONM’s Holiday Tree Skirt. We will be procuring enough materials to produce 200 of each ornament.

On Friday, December 16th from 5:00-7:00pm the ONM will host the first annual Creative Community Holiday Tree Lighting. Visitors will be able to come and see our holiday tree that has been decorated with the ornaments produced throughout the month of December. Santa will be at the museum for a photo op.

Participants will be able to pick up their hand made ornaments the following week from the museum.

Hallie Winter, Curator at the Osage Nation Museum said, “The staff at the ONM would like to thank the Osage Nation Foundation Board for approving our grant application to create the1st Annual Creative Community Holiday Ornament Craft Workshop. This workshop will engage and enhance relations with our local community while providing a fun filled, ONM collections related activity. While the target audience for participation is the youth in our community this event is all-inclusive and we hope to connect with a multitude of individuals of all ages. This workshop and resulting event will not only engage the youth but their parents as well, leading to return visits and reinforcing the museum’s “brand” as a welcoming, engaging and educational resource for our community and tourists alike. We are happy to be collaborating with the Wah Zha Zhi Cultural Center and the ON Education Department on this endeavor. ”

About the Osage Nation Museum:

The premiere destination to experience Osage history, art, and culture
Visit the Osage Nation Museum (ONM) in historic Pawhuska, Oklahoma. Our continuously changing exhibits convey the story of the Osage people throughout history and celebrate Osage culture today. Highlights include an extensive photograph collection, historical artifacts, and traditional and contemporary art. Founded in 1938, the ONM is the oldest tribally owned museum in the United States.

Admission and parking is free.

Contact Information:

Phone: 918-287-5441
Fax: 918-287-5227
Email: museum@osagenation-nsn.gov
Website: http://www.osagenation-nsn.gov/museum
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OsageNationMuseum/

Location:
819 Grandview Avenue Pawhuska, OK 74056 

A Guided Tour of the Osage Nation Museum with Curator, Hallie Winter

Osage Nation Museum Curator, Hallie Winter

Osage Nation Museum Curator, Hallie Winter


By: Roseanne McKee

Curator Hallie Winter, who became the museum’s curator in May 2016, spoke to Pawhuska People about the updates she and Collections Manager, Callie Martin, are making at the Osage Nation Museum.

Describing her vision, Curator Hallie Winter said: “What we wanted to do was make the place more warm and inviting and feel like home. That had a lot to do with our color choices for the walls.

Some lighting and fire system improvements have also been made.

“We’re getting new LED track lighting; there is a new fire suppression system, not utilizing water; it doesn’t remove all the oxygen, so it’s still safe, less harmful to the art and a lot better than water,” Winter explained.

Display cases have gotten a facelift as well.

“We to wanted stay true to the original case that’s here so we played up that. We’ve redone a lot of our other display cases to match. They were covered in paint, so we’ve stripped them, and tried to match them the best we could. We also had some cases donated by the other museum in town, the Osage County Historical Society Museum.”

In the main gallery is what she described as a semi-permanent exhibit, which beautifully tells Osage history chronologically through artifacts, text and photos.

“It’s is a loose timeline of Osage history. The objects will change periodically for object safe-keeping and to give them a rest … and bring out new ones.

“We start with the origin story in this corner,” Winter said, pointing to the northeast corner of the main gallery.

A print of the mural showing Osages descending to earth and landing is part of the display. The original mural is located at the Osage Congress, located just south of the museum.

“If guests want to see the full-sized mural, they can go next door to the [Osage Congress] Chambers to see it.”

Maps are an important part of telling the Osage history story.

“Then we move to our ancestor lands in pre-history. This shows our migration patterns,” Winter said.

Winter pointed out the time period from 500 to 900 A.D.

“Those are different routes we took and then you can see as it goes down after 1350, when we were in the Missouri River Valley; then we started moving out. The Osage Historic Preservation Department has been working really hard on this. The information for these maps comes from them. They keep adding to it as they are making more discoveries,” Winter explained.

The orange portion of one of the maps shows Osage ancestral territory. The map shows as far east as Pennsylvania and north into Illinois.
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The displays also feature artifacts or objects and tools the Osage would have used, Winter said, — “flutes, pipes and also some of the stones for grinding corn and grain for food preparation and before leather how they made pouches.”

When the display describes contact with Westerners, artifacts that resulted from trade are featured.

“We tell the story of when the explorers first came into contact with the Osage and what happened as a result of that, which is trade; so we have trade tokens, early trade beads and metal products. We have a photo of one of the first trading stores in Osage County in Fairfax.
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Museum guests are encouraged to share what they know about photos and displayed items, Winter added.

“We are still fine tuning the information. People come in, they may know information and that’s been really helpful,” Winter said.

One case showcases Osage art and traditional forms of artwork.
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“We have a little bit of everything: ribbon work, finger weaving, moccasins, designs on old parfleches.” Parfleches are bags made of different materials, such as bison hide, Winter explained.

There is a display case devoted to describing what Osages did with the wealth derived from the Osage oil and gas estate. International travel became an Osage leisure pastime.

Next, was a display describing Osage treaties.

“When we were doing treaties, we would pass the pipe. When we travelled to Washington D.C., we’d dress in our finest,” Winter explained. “In a lot of the treaties, the government was supposed to give us tools for farming as a condition,” Winter said.

The government display case “tells a little about the Osage government and how it’s evolved over the past few hundred years,” Winter said.

Part II of the Winter Interview Coming Soon!